Search

City Council Pursues Rent Control Charter Amendment

What is it? What are the short-term and long-term outcomes?


In case you missed it at the 1/29/2021 City Council meeting, we may have a new ballot amendment to vote on in November. Here is the content from the City Council agenda:


Rent stabilization charter amendment (2021-00104)

  1. Pursuant to notice, motion by Gordon, Ellison, and Bender to introduce the subject matter of an ordinance, to be submitted to the voters at the November 2, 2021, municipal election, proposing amendments to Article IV of the City Charter relating to City Council, for first reading and referral to the Policy & Government Oversight Committee, pertaining to explicitly adding the City's authority to exercise power to control rents on private residential property in the City.

  2. Pursuant to notice, motion by Gordon, Ellison, and Bender to introduce the subject matter of an ordinance, to be submitted to the voters at the November 2, 2021, municipal election, proposing amendments to Article I of the City Charter relating to General Provisions, for first reading and referral to the Policy & Government Oversight Committee, pertaining to adding initiative and referendum for the sole purpose of exercising the City's authority to control rents on private residential property in the City.

Action Taken: Introduced, given its first reading, and referred to POGO meeting of Feb 10, 2021


If you are looking for a greater understanding of rent control, it may help to listen to this Freakonomics podcast. The link also has a transcript of the podcast content. The short story:


"As we’ve been hearing, economists are generally opposed to rent control. It rewards some people, but fairly arbitrarily; it punishes many others, and generally doesn’t do much to improve overall access to housing. That said, most people don’t think like economists, or even believe them. Which is why many politicians and members of the public think rent control is a great idea."


Learn about the experiences of rent control in New York, San Francisco, Boston, Cambridge and even Stockholm, Sweden from these experts:

  • Rebecca Diamond, Associate Professor of Economics at Stanford Graduate School of Business.

  • David Eisenbach, history lecturer at Columbia University.

  • Vicki Been, New York City’s deputy mayor for housing and economic development.

  • Ed Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard University.

  • Tommy Andersson, economics professor at Lund University.

If you'd like to speak and offer public comment at the February 3rd Charter Commission meeting (4:00 pm), sign up here.

19 views0 comments
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon

 Copyright © 2019 - VOXMN, Inc. - All Rights Reserved